Social Security Judges File Lawsuit Alleging They are Held to Quotas

Claims for Social Security Disability Insurance take a long time to be processed and decided these days. An increase in the number of claims in recent years has caused wait times for some applicants to stretch into the hundreds of days. It is in everyone’s best interest for this backlog to be eliminated so that every new application can be decided in a timely manner.

To that end, the Social Security Administration (SSA) encourages its administrative law judges (ALJs) to hear between 500 and 700 claims each year – they call the numbers a “goal.” But some judges claim that the numbers constitute an unlawful “quota.” And now the judges are taking the SSA to court.

The Association of Administrative Law Judges (AALJ) recently filed suit on behalf of 1400 of its members, claiming that the SSA’s expectations cause them to have to improperly rush evaluations. It also creates an incentive to approve cases because approvals are faster than denials. This leads to the potential approval of claims that should be denied, which results in greater fraud, abuse, waste, and expense to taxpayers, the judges say. Their specific legal allegation is that the agency’s directive violates the Administrative Procedure Act and the Social Security Act. They also claim, contrary to the agency’s statements, that judges who do not hear enough cases are subject to reprimands, “counseling,” and “threats and intimidation,” according to the lawsuit.

SSA Commissioner Michael J. Astrue, who was appointed by President Bush, stepped down in February, 2013. President Obama has not yet named a successor – the agency is currently headed by acting commissioner Carolyn Colvin, a former secretary of the Maryland Department of Human Resources. Judge Randall Frye, president of the AALJ, says a lack of permanent leadership may be contributing to the problem.

“One way to protect the treasury and help deserving claimants is to end the quota system,” Frye said. “However, an acting commissioner may not feel that she has the authority to make the necessary changes and correct problems.”

Meanwhile, the Disability Insurance Trust Fund, from which disability benefits are paid, is currently paying out more than it is taking in. It is projected to reach zero in 2016. If that were to happen, it would result in an immediate 21 percent cut in benefits to nearly 11 million Americans with disabilities.

Disability insurance, like most government programs these days, faces intense budgetary pressures. Even in good economic times, ALJs will scrutinize disability claims to make sure taxpayer money is not wasted. If you are disabled, it pays to have an experienced Social Security Disability attorney on your side to get you the benefits you deserve in a timely manner.

Posted on Wednesday, June 12th, 2013. Filed under Social Security Disability.